Kim Welsh

Our Riverfront, Past and Present

May 01, 2019
From the French Quarter, visitors can see with their own eyes how New Orleans earned the nickname the “Crescent City” as large vessels follow the dramatic turn in the river upon which the early city was situated. The site of the original town was built in 1718 along the banks of “Old Muddy,” the Mississippi River's sweeping crescent-shaped bend. Ancient silt deposits from floods created ground higher than found in nearby swamps forming natural levees. In 1722, construction of a low levee was completed to help prevent flooding of the city.

Savor Our Creole Tomato Festival

May 01, 2019
In New Orleans, a rite of summer is our first taste of the coveted and meaty Creole tomato. The Creole tomato was originally imported from the West Indies and thrives in southern Louisiana's rich soil and subtropical climate. When the farmers in nearby St. Bernard and Plaquemines parishes first called their tomatoes Creole, it meant they were grown in the rich alluvial soil of the area and vine ripened because they did not have to be transported long distances to market. This gave them a rich flavor.

It's Party Time

February 05, 2019
The “Greatest Show on Earth,” otherwise known as Mardi Gras, will be celebrated this year on Tuesday, March 5th. The biggest free party thrown in North America always falls 46 days before Easter and is the city's most popular attraction. Visitors and locals alike love the party atmosphere, the crowds, costumed revelers, and the esprit de corps.

Samba Your Way Into Carnival

February 05, 2019
As an avid traveler, I have many places I want to visit on my bucket list. Among them, I have always wanted to spend Carnival in the largely Catholic city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Rio is home to the world's most famous Carnival celebration and what many people consider to be the world's biggest and best party. The basis of Rio's Carnival is the samba school, which is a social club named after the famous Brazilian dance. Samba schools are based in different neighborhoods of Rio de Janeiro, and rivalry among them is fierce.

"Killing 'em Dead with Needle and Thread" A Brief History of Mardi Gras Indians

February 05, 2019
One beautiful Fat Tuesday, my dear native New Orleanian friend, Kyle, invited me to take a walk a few blocks from Bourbon Street to the historic Tremé neighborhood, America’s oldest community of free black people, to catch a glimpse of a tradition that he described as “uniquely New Orleans but nothing like the booze and beads of the French Quarter.” Intrigued, I decided to take a stroll across Rampart Street to the Backstreet Cultural Museum at 1116 Henriette Delille Street. There, in the shadow of St.

There’s Something About Being Anonymous

February 05, 2019
As a native New Orleanian, my favorite tradition to share with family and friends is the annual Mardi Gras Mask Market, a four-day family-friendly festival and a unique specialized craft fair showcasing artisan mask makers. The days, as one may expect, are filled with live local music, usually involving brass bands, local legends, and Mardi Gras Indian groups, food, drink, and Bacchanalian revelry.

Get Versed in Jazz and More in the Vieux Carré

November 05, 2018
No trip to the Crescent City would be complete without delectable seafood, great music, sweeping views of the Mississippi River and the wonderful architecture surrounding it, including the New Orleans Jazz Museum where the music New Orleans made famous is explored in all its forms in the very place it was born. The museum is housed in the historic Old U.S. Mint located at 400 Esplanade Avenue, strategically located at the intersection of the French Quarter and the Frenchmen Street live music corridor, the heart of the city’s vibrant music scene.

Pack Santa’s Sack Along the French Market District Colonnade

November 05, 2018
It’s the most wonderful time of the year! My girlfriend Christine and I always vow to give back to our community we love by doing all of our holiday shopping with local businesses. We think it is only fair to support the shops who give back to the city where we live, work, and play. Our favorite wonderland is the French Quarter, so we always look forward to a shopping extravaganza there during the holidays. We shop ‘til we drop, stop for lunch, and shop some more.

Ghostly Gallivants and Voodoo in the Vieux Carre

July 27, 2018
Strolling down Toulouse Street one warm summer night, I caught a hazy glimpse of an old woman appear out of nowhere. She was dressed in black with beads in her hand as she stepped into a doorway. Curious, I went to see where she went. As I approached the doorway, I felt a coolness and noted a strange aroma. Old yellowed mail was stuck in the door making it obvious that the place had not been visited recently. Goosebumps covered my arms, and I went home to research the area. Nearby is The Olivier House, a charming little hotel built in 1836 by Madame Olivier, a wealthy plantation owner.

Shop 'til You Drop Along the French Market District Colonnade

July 27, 2018
My best friend, Christine, is proud to admit that she is a shopaholic. She knows all the best spots to shop for any occasion. She knows how to pace herself by tying in music and craft events for diversion, and she wines and dines along the way to easily fill an entire day with everything she enjoys. She’s a pro shopper but she was kind enough to allow a novice like me to tag along.

Royalty, Explorers, and Clever Con Men Or A Salute to Bienville, Our Founding Father

May 07, 2018
When reflecting on our tricentennial and our history, it is important to remember that without Bienville, there would be no New Orleans. Enjoy a stroll over to the 400 block of Decatur Street to view the statue erected in 1955 to honor a French-Canadian explorer and colonizer, Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne, Sieur de Bienville. He founded New Orleans on a crescent-shaped piece of high ground in the bend of the Mississippi River, a place that he felt would be safe from hurricanes and tidal surges.